China's FAST telescope identifies over 300 pulsars

Sci-Tech

China's Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, has identified over 300 pulsars so far.

XinhuaUpdated: March 30, 2021

China's Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, has identified over 300 pulsars so far.

Photo taken on March 28, 2021 shows the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) in southwest China's Guizhou Province. (Xinhua/Ou Dongqu)

Located in a deep and round karst depression in southwest China's Guizhou Province, FAST is believed to be the world's most sensitive radio telescope. It started formal operations on Jan. 11, 2020.

The largest single-dish radio telescope in the world has a huge potential for verifying and exploring mysteries of the universe in fields including gravity theory, galaxy evolution, the origin of stars and planets and even the origin of matter and life.

The comprehensive performance of the telescope is more than 10 times higher than that of other radio telescopes in the world, significantly expanding the limits of human observation of the universe, according to Wu Xiangping, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.